Dalawang mag asawa namatay ng sabay na magkapareho ang oras at araw habang nasa iisang ospital lamang

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A couple that used to be married for 65 years died just hours aside after spending some time together one last time.

Jack and Harriet Morrison each died previously this month at a nursing home in St. Louis, Missouri. They spent their ultimate hours collectively thanks to the nursing team of workers at The Woodlands of Arnold.

"This is what movies are made of," their niece, Sue Wagener, instructed CNN. "They have been certainly in love."

Scour the headlines and you will locate many cases where when one half of a long-married couple dies, the 2d loss of life follows. Doctors frequently name it broken heart syndrome. But even if the instances don't seem to be rare, they're no much less heartbreaking.

Jack and Harriet Morrison on their wedding day.

Jack met Harriet in 1955 and never seemed back. He used to be 21 years old, and was following in his father's footsteps at the family business, V-K Bus Lines.


He met Harriet, then 18, when he used to be riding one of the company's buses.
The pair, Wagener said, quickly grew to be inseparable.

"They had been constantly preserving hands," Wagener stated of the couple. "You in no way see them barring them touching one some other or his arm around her."

Jack and Harriet Morrison throughout their closing years together.
As the enterprise grew, Jack sooner or later sold it to retire in his early 50's. When he became a licensed pilot, the two traveled around the world.

"I'm sure that they went two or three times to each country throughout the United States," Wagener said. "They went to Australia, they went to Germany, they went to Russia."

Jack and Harriet Morrison holding hands for the duration of their closing months together.
Harriet was once admitted to the nursing domestic about a 12 months and a 1/2 ago. She tripped over the canine and was once hurt.


Jack suffered an injury not lengthy after that, and he joined her there.
In the last few months, she developed dementia, so there had been days when she remembered him and different days when she didn't, Wagener said.

"Those nurses were super to them," the niece said. "When she had a desirable day, they would put them together. They'd devour breakfast or have espresso and they would simply sit down there and maintain hands."

Their separate rooms had been simply 4 doorways down from one another at the nursing home, and in their remaining hours, the group of workers moved them together.

"I love, I omit them," Wagener said of the couple. "I be aware of that they're blissful together, again."

Source: CNN

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